How to Find Inspiration in Poetry: The Peace of the Wild Things

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.
-William Berry

I think this is an absolutely beautiful poem for many reasons. Two main thoughts came to mind when I first heard it as I was attending a Compassion in Therapy summit in April (yes, I know I do a lot of these types of summits, they’re terrific). The first, is that it does remind me of self-compassion practices, and second, that nature has ultimate healing powers. While I’ve blogged about these topics before, I want to write about them in the context of this poem, as a way for me (and you) to remember why they are so important, especially if you have a chronic illness.

Costa Rica, 2019

Self-Compassion

Self-compassion is comprised of 3 elements: mindfulness, common humanity, and self-kindness. In the poem, Berry describes mindfulness of his thoughts in the first part, and then just being present with full experiencing in the second part. “I come into the presence of still water” and “I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.” These are very mindful phrases and experiences. Then there is the phrase, “I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief.” I see this as relating to common humanity as it suggests that all human “tax their lives” with these thoughts and feelings – in contrast to wild things, which (as far as we know) don’t have the cognitive abilities to have these thoughts that can consume us. Thinking is part of being human. What I think represents self-kindness in this poem is that (a) Berry doesn’t judge himself for having these thoughts, and (b) he makes the decision to take care of himself in the moment and give himself what he needs – a reprieve into nature. Now, I’m personally left to wonder, what can I do today that is self-compassionate? Maybe lay a kind hand on my chest, maybe imagining breathing in compassion for myself and out compassion for others, or maybe it is literally going outside into nature. What do you need?

Nature

Ecotherapy and forest bathing are totally a thing. I actually talked to a client of mine about this recently because they mentioned that they feel good in the forest, literally touching the trees. Me too. So much research supports being in nature. I recently listened to a podcast that suggested even just eating outside is good for us (which I immediately told my parents about because we ate el fresco all summer long when I was growing up). Near my apartment, there is an inlet with beautiful hiking trails along it and tons of big, beautiful trees that are ever-so-present in British Columbia. The air is so refreshing, especially if it’s recently rained. Everything about this trail (and really a lot of trails in this province) makes me feel good. Both physically and mentally. I had the same experience in Costa Rica. My friend and I would touch the trees and vines, really connecting with the beauty and nature, and all of the healing properties of it. When’s the last time you spent time outside? Is there a park near you that you can go to? Can you eat outside on your patio or deck?

Sometimes we can find inspiration to improve the quality of our lives (with these easy and gentle practices) in the most interesting places, like The Peace of the Wild Things. I hope this inspires you to keep making the most of it!

Video: Daily Exercise – Mountain Hikes

This is not for the faint of heart. To be honest, this is great if you’ve been building up your exercise game and if you do some hiking already. I did a video post last year on more gentle hikes, which are a fantastic alternative to going for a walk. This is kind of levelling up those gentle hikes. Yes, I do this even with chronic pain. Why? Because I love hiking, and will take the time to recover (for example, the day after I did this I did a channel float where I sat on a tube for 3 hours and floated down a channel/river). Remember to please consult with your healthcare team before starting any new exercise. Alright, take care and keep making the most of it!

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Forest Bathing for Mental Health & Chronic Illness

I was doing a guided meditation through my meditation app (Calm) a few weeks ago and the concept of shinrin-yoku was introduced. This translates to forest bathing. I did a blog on nature therapy back in the summer I believe, and this kind of ties in with that, but I thought I’d like to explore this concept further because I find it really interesting. As someone who is not religious, and I usually say my spirituality revolves around the Force (for you fellow Star Wars fans), but in reality I find that immersing myself in nature can be a very spiritual experience. It can also be a very healing experience, more emotionally than physically (though depending on exactly how you are immersed it can be both).

Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, May 2019

The idea of shinrin-yoku or forest bathing, is to just be in nature. To come into contact with it in a mindful way, using your five senses. Anywhere there is a forest, you can do this practice. In a lot of ways it is similar to being mindful in other experiences. For example, if you take a mindful walk, even if you live in the city. The advantage of forest bathing is that you are removed from the hustle and bustle of city life, and can truly experience nature and its natural healing powers. I know this might sound a little woo-woo to some of you, but there is a lot of evidence for benefits to both our mental and physical health. Click this link for a study on how it can improve cardiovascular health. Not only can you do this practice in almost every country, you can do it in any weather (assuming you’re not opposed to certain weather).

Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, 2019. Isn’t it adorable?!

Like I mentioned there have been shown to be benefits for mental health, and there are many nature therapists out there. Here’s a link to find them. Interestingly, that link also has another link to training in it for therapists so now I’m thinking that might be interesting for me to take. Of course, you can also just go and be in nature alone or with a friend. Looking back at my trip to Costa Rica, I realize that my friend Nikki (check out her podcast episode here) and I did a lot of this forest bathing there. Though there were times where we’d pull out of cameras and take pictures, or we’d chat as we hiked, there were many times where we’d just walk and experience nature (yes, using all five senses) in these amazing rainforests. That whole trip was extremely healing and amazing for me, but I didn’t realize until recently that (a) I was forest bathing for parts of it, and (b) that just being away from the city was so powerful for me (and this is coming from someone who LOVES big city life).

To be honest, I’m not even sure where we were in Costa Rica, but it was somewhere near Manuel Antonio.

Here’s how to forest bathe:

  • go without technology, or at least, keep your phone/camera/etc out of reach (I have a small hiking backpack that is very useful for this)
  • you don’t have to have a purpose, the point is to just be. So walk, explore, enjoy.
  • take the time to really examine nature closely with your eyes
  • notice what the ground feels like beneath you as you walk, or even touch a tree and notice what that is like for you.
  • take some time to sit and listen to nature
  • also breathe it in, what does it smell like?
  • taste the air around you – likely it’s quite different than when you’re in the city
  • and try not to talk to anyone while you’re doing it
I definitely used all 5 senses in the Cloud Forest.

If you’ve done some forest bathing, I would love to hear your experience with it! Remember mindfulness leads to contacting the present moment, which has huge benefits on your overall health. Keep making the most of it everyone!